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TV Corner: Shadow and Bone!!!!!!!

I thought I would give myself some time before writing this so that I could put together some coherent thoughts instead of just endlessly screaming like the fangirl I am, but I’ll probably just end up screaming anyway, because I absolutely loved this. It’s just. The gold standard of adaptations, to be honest. It exceeded all my expectations. From the talented cast to the gorgeous music to the special effects to the costumes to the unexpected humor, I just!!! I binged the whole eight episodes in a day, something I haven’t done in ages, and by the end I just wanted more. It wasn’t flawless — the questionable depiction of anti-Asian racism Alina faces is glaring, and I’ll talk about that — but overall my serotonin levels definitely shot up.

I read the original trilogy way back in 2013. It’s a series that has stuck with me and left a strong impression, and I was surprised when I went back to look at my review to find that I only rated the books 4 and 3 stars. I think even then I was kind of frustrated with some of the that era’s YA tropes, most of which the series thankfully excised! I do want to talk about my thoughts in more detail, so spoilers will follow below, in messy bullet point format, because I don’t have the brain cells for a well-organized essay right now.

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Goodbye, My Wayward Sons: A Supernatural Retrospective

I started watching Supernatural in 2013, which is quite late for a show that aired on a channel that went defunct in 2006 (The WB). Supernatural itself had aired a year earlier, in 2005, and with its eleventh season became the longest running American fantasy television series in history. In 2013, I was a junior in college, just starting to develop a critical consciousness and an awareness of feminism, but at that point I had spent years immersed in fandom, so I was familiar with media criticism.

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TV Corner: Monsterland

Monsterland is kind of like Black Mirror, only with supernatural creatures instead of technology. Based on the short story collection North American Lake Monsters by Nathan Ballingrud, it is indeed very American in its horrors; I might even call it a modern iteration of American Gothic. It’s not a Creature Feature; though the monsters are very, very present, they are not the focus of the horror. They are only peripheral to the very human characters’ trauma and the hard and sometimes despicable choices they find themselves forced to make when put between a rock and a hard place.

Monsterland is an indictment of the failures of the so-called American Dream. Its characters struggle with poverty, sub-par healthcare, sexual assault, lack of abortion access, racism, abusive parents, corporate greed, mental health, and more. The realism inherent in their struggles elicits an existential dread that easily eclipses any fear of monsters. And no, it’s not particularly subtle in its messaging, but it doesn’t need to be. It’s a show very suitable for 2020, and I absolutely loved it.

I want to talk about the individual episodes, but it’s very difficult to do so without spoiling some plot elements, so be aware of that if you continue to read, if you want to remain totally unspoiled. However, while I’ll be revealing significant plot details, I’ll avoid revealing any major twists or reveals.

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TV Corner: Alex Karev and the Clash of Watsonian and Doylist Dynamics

In fandom discourse, there exists the concept of Watsonian vs. Doylist reasoning. The terms are thought to originate from the Sherlock Holmes fandom. Simply put, a Watsonian interpretation of canon attempts to explain events from an in-universe perspective, while Doylist reasoning explains these same events from a real-world perspective, thereby treating the events as created objects. Essentially, a Doylist understanding of media acknowledges the intents and actions of creators and actors, while Watsonian interpretations do not. Sometimes, these two opposing dynamics will clash in a way that leads to character assassination. There is no better example of this than the departure of Alex Karev from Grey’s Anatomy.

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