Uncategorized

Monthly Wrap-Up: April 2022

  • When the Reckoning Comes by LaTanya McQueen (★★★☆☆)
  • The Justice of Kings by Richard Swan (★★★★☆)
  • A Curse So Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer (★★★★☆)
  • Sundial by Catriona Ward (★★★★☆)

MONTHLY TOTAL: 4
YEARLY SO FAR: 17

Not too many books this month, but the number is deceptive, because I DNF’d FIVE whole books in April. Granted, I thankfully didn’t make it super far into any of them, but still, that was a lot of time spent reading that amounted to nothing. But hey, I tried, and I ended up clearing a few books off my shelves, so that’s always a win. I also spent most of my time this month watching television, which was a nice change of pace!

Continue reading “Monthly Wrap-Up: April 2022”
Uncategorized

TV Corner: Monsterland

Monsterland is kind of like Black Mirror, only with supernatural creatures instead of technology. Based on the short story collection North American Lake Monsters by Nathan Ballingrud, it is indeed very American in its horrors; I might even call it a modern iteration of American Gothic. It’s not a Creature Feature; though the monsters are very, very present, they are not the focus of the horror. They are only peripheral to the very human characters’ trauma and the hard and sometimes despicable choices they find themselves forced to make when put between a rock and a hard place.

Monsterland is an indictment of the failures of the so-called American Dream. Its characters struggle with poverty, sub-par healthcare, sexual assault, lack of abortion access, racism, abusive parents, corporate greed, mental health, and more. The realism inherent in their struggles elicits an existential dread that easily eclipses any fear of monsters. And no, it’s not particularly subtle in its messaging, but it doesn’t need to be. It’s a show very suitable for 2020, and I absolutely loved it.

I want to talk about the individual episodes, but it’s very difficult to do so without spoiling some plot elements, so be aware of that if you continue to read, if you want to remain totally unspoiled. However, while I’ll be revealing significant plot details, I’ll avoid revealing any major twists or reveals.

Continue reading “TV Corner: Monsterland”

Uncategorized

TV Corner: The Television Tag!

The Television Tag was created by Tiffany at Bookish Tiffany but I found it on Fatma’s blog! And I’m a total TV junkie, so of course I had to do this immediately.

I…probably spent way too much time on this, but it was very fun, so I have no regrets.

Continue reading “TV Corner: The Television Tag!”

Uncategorized

Monthly Wrap-Up: March 2020

  • In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado (★★★★★)
  • My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell (★★★★★)
  • The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James (★★★★☆)
  • When We Were Magic by Sarah Gailey (★★★☆☆)
  • A History of Magic and Witchcraft by Frances Timbers (★★★★☆)
  • Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng (★★★★☆)
  • The Shadows Between Us by Tricia Levenseller (★★★★☆)
  • Trail of Lightening by Rebecca Roanhorse (★★☆☆☆)
  • The Return by Rachel Harrison (★★★★☆)
  • The Dead Girls Club by Damien Angelica Walters (★★★★☆)
  • The Demonists by Thomas Sniegowski (★★☆☆☆)
  • Untamed Shore by Silvia Moreno-Garcia (★★★★★)

MONTHLY TOTAL: 12
YEARLY SO FAR: 35

So…March has been one hell of a year, huh?

Continue reading “Monthly Wrap-Up: March 2020”

Uncategorized

TV Corner: Alex Karev and the Clash of Watsonian and Doylist Dynamics

In fandom discourse, there exists the concept of Watsonian vs. Doylist reasoning. The terms are thought to originate from the Sherlock Holmes fandom. Simply put, a Watsonian interpretation of canon attempts to explain events from an in-universe perspective, while Doylist reasoning explains these same events from a real-world perspective, thereby treating the events as created objects. Essentially, a Doylist understanding of media acknowledges the intents and actions of creators and actors, while Watsonian interpretations do not. Sometimes, these two opposing dynamics will clash in a way that leads to character assassination. There is no better example of this than the departure of Alex Karev from Grey’s Anatomy.

Continue reading “TV Corner: Alex Karev and the Clash of Watsonian and Doylist Dynamics”